DATASOURCE BASED LOOKUPS IN TABLEAU

a collaborative blog by Ken Flerlage and Klaus Schulte

The Challenge

Last week at work I (Klaus) puzzled my head over an interesting question. I was looking at production orders and production dates and had to calculate differences between production dates:

  • If a production order has consecutive production days (the datediff between the days is 1) then the machine only has to be equipped once.
  • If the datediff between two production days is >1, the machine has to be equipped on each production date.

The Table Calculation-Approach

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Building a tournament flow in a single-elimination & exponential tournament structure

Ludovic Tavernier and I have spent quite some time on our collaboration project about the rise of tennis legend Boris Becker. One key element of our viz is something that we have called ‘bump trees‘, a two-layer chart that is combining (horizontal) tournament trees in the first layer with (vertical) bump lines to connect the different tournament trees of a player in the second layer (click the image to play with the interactive version and to read our entire data essay on Tableau Public). Continue reading “Building a tournament flow in a single-elimination & exponential tournament structure”

#SportsVizSunday Challenge Dec 2018

When Simon, Spencer and James asked me earlier this year if I could join the #sportsvizsunday team as a guest host for one of the upcoming months I was very honored, and my answer was of course ‘yes’. I have followed this initiative since it was established, and it has always been fun to work with datasets on various sports in or beside the monthly challenges throughout the year. I have always used these challenges as opportunities to learn new techniques and chart types.

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Creating Data-Driven Scoring-Models

Scoring-Models are something like a Swiss Army Knife in decision-making and you can use them on almost unlimited occasions. They are models in which various criteria are weighted and result in a score. Based on this score a conclusion or a decision can be made or an advice can be given.

They follow a very structured setup:

  1. Define criteria
  2. Weight criteria
  3. Assess alternatives based on the defined criteria (e. g. on a scale from 1-10)
  4. Calculate part-scores ( 2. x 3. )
  5. Calculate overall score ( ∑ 4. )

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